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Frequently Asked Questions

  • Abbreviations

    What are the abbreviations used for NI Government Departments?

    The number of Northern Ireland government departments has been reduced from 12 to nine. The functions and services delivered by the 12 former departments have been restructured and transferred to the relevant new department.

    What do the geographical abbreviations (e.g. LGD) stand for?

    The geographical abbreviations which are commonly used on NINIS are listed below:

    • NI - Northern Ireland(1)
    • NUTSI - Nomenclature of territorial units for statistics (equivalent to NI) (1)
    • NUTSII - Nomenclature of territorial units for statistics (equivalent to NI) (1)
    •  
    • HSCT - Health & Social Care Trust (5)
    • HSSB - Health & Social Services Board (4)
    • ELB - Education Library Board (5)
    • NUTS III - Nomenclature of territorial units for statistics(equivalent to aggregates of certain Local Government District (5)

     

    • LGD2014 - Local Government District 2014 (11)
    • LGD - Local Government District (26)
    • DC - District Council Area (same as LGD) (26)
    • PSNI Areas - Equivalent to LGDs except Belfast LGD (4 PSNI areas) (29)
    • AA - Assembly Area 2011 (18)
    • WPC - Westminster Parliamentary Constituency 2008 (same as PC2008/ AA  and AA 2011) (18)
    • PC - Parliamentary Constituency 2008 (same as WPC/ AA  and AA 2011)(18)

     

    • AA1998 - Assembly Area 1998 (same as PC 1992) (18)
    • PC1992 - Parliamentary Constituency 1992 (same as PC 1992) (18)
    • DEA - District Electoral Area (aggregates of Wards) (101)
    • DEA2014 - District Electoral Area 2014 (80)

     

    • NRA - Neighbourhood Renewal Area (36)
    • Ward - Electoral Ward (582)
    • SOA - Super Output Area (890)
    • SA - Small Area (4537)
    • OA - Output Area (5022)

     

    • SETT2005 - Settlements 2005
    • SETT2015 - Settlements 2015

    What other abbreviations are used on the website?

    Other abbreviations used are:

    • NINIS - Northern Ireland Neighbourhood Information Service
    • MYE - Mid Year Estimates
    • Ifh - Investing for Health
    • NRA - Neighbourhood Renewal Area
    • MLB - Making Life Better
    • NISRA - Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency
    • NIMDM - Northern Ireland Multiple Deprivation Measure
    • NRA - Neighbourhood Renewal Area
    • DO - Development Office
  • Census 2011

    How can I access Census 2011 Results on NINIS?

    There are several ways to access the Census 2011 results on NINIS. You can use the Area Profile, Statistics or Maps options from the main menu bar on the website.

    1. To view the full Census 2011 data tables, hover over the Statistics button on the main menu bar and select Census 2011. All of the Census 2011 data tables are listed here. You can then filter for the required geography.

    2. To view the Census 2011 results for a particular area, e.g. where you live, click on the Area Profile option. You can then enter your postcode, street or area and filter for the geographical level you require, e.g. Health Trust or Ward.

    3. To view interactive maps, hover over the Interactive Content button on the main menu bar and select Census 2011. Currently, there are interactive maps for Age Structure; Car or Van Availability; Economic Activity; Health and Provision of Unpaid Care; Household Composition; National Identity (Classifications 1 and 2); Qualifications and Students; Religion or Religion Brought Up In; Tenure and Landlord, Usual Residents born in NI who have resided elsewhere, and population pyramids available for Census 2011.

    What is a Census?

    A Census provides an estimate of the population of Northern Ireland and is held every 10 years. The most recent Census took place on Sunday 27 March 2011. The one before that was held on 29 April 2001.

    Everyone was asked the same questions on the same day so that we get a snapshot of the population. This information is used to estimate the number of people and households in each area, and their characteristics. 

    The full list “Frequently Asked Questions” published by Census Office can be found on the NISRA website.

    Who runs the Census?

    The Census is organised by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA), headed by the Registrar General, and overseen by professional statisticians. NISRA works with the Census offices for England and Wales and Scotland to conduct the Census on the same day and to provide comparable Census results across the United Kingdom.

    The full list “Frequently Asked Questions” published by Census Office can be found on the NISRA website.

    Why do we have a Census?

    To help tomorrow take shape. If we know how many people live in Northern Ireland, we can work out what types of services they need now and in the future. With statistics from the Census, central and local government can allocate funds, decide future policy and plan important services such as:

    Population – Knowing how many people live in an area helps central government allocate funding. Local government also use this data to plan who needs what in their local areas.  

    Health and disability – Health services and policies are planned around the Census data so that the necessary services are provided to those who need it.  

    Housing – Housing needs can be much better planned if we know what the demand is now and likely to be in the future.  

    Employment – By establishing how many people work in different occupations and industries, Census information can be used to help plan jobs and training policies.  

    Ethnic groups – Census information can be used to help allocate resources and monitor policies to ensure that all groups are treated equally.  

    Transport – Identifying how and where people travel to work and study will help us understand the pressures on our transport systems and improve planning for roads and public transport.

    The full list “Frequently Asked Questions” published by Census Office can be found on the NISRA website.

    Is it safe, secure and confidential?

    Yes. We’ve made it a top priority to keep your Census data secure and confidential.

    Everyone working with personal Census details is security checked and must sign an undertaking that they will protect the privacy of the information. NISRA owns the data that has been collected. The data is protected by law and will not leave the UK. It is not just important to us; it is actually a criminal offence to disclose personal Census data, punishable by a fine and/or up to two years in prison.

    We also asked independent experts to conduct an information assurance review of the 2011 Census. The review team concluded that “the public can be assured that the information they have provided has been well protected”. Their Final Report and a full list of “Frequently Asked Questions” published by Census Office can be found on the NISRA website.

    What is the timetable for Census outputs?

    The timetable for Census outputs is highlighted in the Northern Ireland 2011 Census Outputs Prospectus which is published on the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) website.

    A full listing of published commissioned tables from 2011 Census can be found in the Commissioned Tables Look-up file.

    The full list “Frequently Asked Questions” published by Census Office can be found on the NISRA website.

    What is a “Household”?

    A household is:

    • one person living alone, or a group of people (not necessarily related) living at the same address who share cooking facilities and share a living room, sitting room or dining area

    The full “Census 2011 Definitions and Output Classifications” paper published by Census Office can be found on the NISRA website.

    What is a “Communal establishment”?

    A Census provides an estimate of the population of Northern Ireland and is held every 10 years. The most recent Census took place on Sunday 27 March 2011. The one before that was held on 29 April 2001.

    Everyone was asked the same questions on the same day so that we get a snapshot of the population. This information is used to estimate the number of people and households in each area, and their characteristics. 

    The full list “Frequently Asked Questions” published by Census Office can be found on the NISRA website.

    How do you define a “Usual resident of the UK”?

    A usual resident of the UK is anyone who, on Census Day 2011, was in the UK and had stayed or intended to stay in the UK for a period of 12 months or more, or had a permanent UK address and was outside the UK and intended to be outside the UK for less than 12 months.

    Where can I find definitions and footnotes for Census 2011 tables?

    The “Census 2011 Definitions and Output Classifications” document published by Census Office contains a full list of definitions and footnotes; and can be found on the NISRA website.

    Can I compare 2001 Census and 2011 Census results?

    Details of the differences in the 2001 and 2011 census questionnaires and their impact on outputs can be found at: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/census/comp_2011.pdf

    Details on changes to table layouts and content from 2001 Census may be found at: http://www.nisra.gov.uk/Census/comp_app_2011.pdf

    The full list of “Frequently Asked Questions” published by Census Office can be found on the NISRA website.

    Now that the Key Statistics at Small Area have been published, can I compare small area statistics from the 2001 and 2011 Census?

    Any comparison of 2001 and 2011 statistics depends primarily on three considerations – population coverage, questionnaire content and geographic units.

    On population coverage, both the 2001 and 2011 Census outputs reflect the complete population on Census Day 2001 and Census Day 2011.

    A paper comparing the 2001 and 2011 Census questionnaires can be accessed by clicking here: https://www.nisra.gov.uk/sites/nisra.gov.uk/files/publications/comparability-census-questionnaires-between-2001-and-2011.pdf

    The 2001 and 2011 Censuses both report statistics based on the current set of electoral wards and Local Government Districts, and accordingly Census outputs for 2001 and 2011 can be compared for these geographic units. For smaller geographic units, direct comparison can be made between 2001 and 2011, but such comparisons should be made with caution. A note providing more detail is available and can be accessed by clicking here: https://www.nisra.gov.uk/publications/small-area-look-tables-and-guidance-documents

    Can I compare 2001 Census and 2011 Census Results on NINIS?

    Hover over the Statistics button on the main menu bar and select Build your own tables. Select a geography, then choose from the list individual, e.g. LGDs, Wards, SOAs etc and click Next. Select Census 2001 and 2011. Select the datasets you want to compare, select both 2001 and 2011, and click Next. Select the variable(s) you want to compare and click Build Table. You can then choose to download and/or print your table.

    Note: Build your own table can only be used for tables stored in the grid format in NINIS, and not for those saved as Excel.

    Details of the differences in the 2001 and 2011 census questionnaires and their impact on outputs can be found at: https://www.nisra.gov.uk/sites/nisra.gov.uk/files/publications/comparability-census-questionnaires-between-2001-and-2011.pdf and this should be taken into account when making comparisons.

    Details on changes to table layouts and content from 2001 Census may be found at: https://www.nisra.gov.uk/sites/nisra.gov.uk/files/publications/comparability-census-outputs-between-2001-and-2011.pdf.

    The full list of “Frequently Asked Questions” published by Census Office can be found on the NISRA website.

    Why are Census 2011 Small Area tables available only in Excel on NINIS, and not in grid format like the administrative or SOA goegraphies?

    The Census 2011 Small Area tables are so large and contain so much data that it would not be feasible to load the data into the grid, nor would it be user-friendly for viewing purposes.

    Will there be any impact on the 2011 Census results at LGD and ward level following the Programme for Government 2011-15?

    The draft programme for government 2011-15 states that the legislation to establish new local government LGDs and wards will not be put in place until the 2012/13 Assembly session. When government formally adopts new local government boundaries, Census Office will re-issue a critical set of 2011 Census outputs for the new LGDs and wards. Such outputs will probably be based on a modelling approach to safeguard confidentiality, and will consult on a new sub-ward geography that will be the basis for official statistical outputs.

    A link to the full information paper released by Census Office can be found on the NISRA website by clicking the following link below: 

    http://www.nisra.gov.uk/Census/pdf/Geographic_Outputs_2011.pdf

    Where can I find results for the United Kingdom from Census 2011?

    The results from Census 2011 for the United Kingdom can be accessed through the Office for National Statistics website: https://www.nisra.gov.uk/statistics/2011-census/results/uk-census-outputs.

    The full list of “Frequently Asked Questions” published by Census Office can be found on the NISRA website.

    Is there Census 2011 information available for the new 11 Districts (LGD 2014)?

    Census population estimates and Key Statistics for the new 11 Districts (LGD2014) are available under the Census 2011 theme. Census population estimates are also available for the 2001 Census under the Census 2001 theme.

    You can also view guidance on Outputs from the 2011 Census and the new local government boundaries on the NISRA website.

    What are Microdata SARs?

    SARs, as the name suggests, are samples of individual records drawn from the Census outputs database which have been completely anonymised. Such samples can be based on individual person level records or individual household level records and have typically been utilised for research purposes. Steps are taken to preserve the confidentiality of all individual records (both person based and household based) that are included in any such sample. In addition, access arrangements are very much tailored to reflect both the nature and detail of the information included for each record. Further information on microdata can be found in our Microdata Product Overview document on the NISRA website.

  • Geography

    Why have the Local Government District ( LGD2014) names changed?

    Statutory rules which came into operation on 24 February 2016 changed the name of three Local Government Districts (LGD2014)

    From 24 February, new datasets will use the new District Names and a FAQ has been added to NINIS to highlight the names previously used. The NINIS website has been updated so that all datasets (grid view) and Area Profiles reflect the new District Names from this date.

    Downloadable files (Open Document Format and Winzips) and Interactive Content will be updated on a rolling programme as datasets are updated with latest year data. Existing infographics/factsheets/bulletins will not be revised.

    Users can view statistics on the NINIS website by both code and council names so users can identify statistics for the council they are interested in. Users should note that the order the geographies appear in the grid view and downloadable files may vary. The dataset in grid view is ordered by LGD2014 name. Datasets in downloadable files are ordered by LGD2014 codes.

    What are statistical and administrative geographies?

    Most of the datasets on NINIS are presented at two geographic levels - administrative geographies and statistical geographies.

    Administrative geography datasets contain data at some or all of the following geographies - Ward, Local Government District, Assembly Area 1998, Assembly Area, Health Board and Health Trust. Administrative geographies are so named as they were designed for the purposes of public administration, for example voting or organising health services.

    Statistical geography datasets contain data at Output Area (Census 2001 outputs), Small Area (Census 2011 outputs) and/or Super Output Area level. Statistical geographies were designed as small geographies at which to present statistics. As such statistical geographies tend to vary less in size than administrative geographies.

    Usually more variables are available within an administrative geography dataset as the areas are larger in size than statistical geographies, and so less prone to the risk of disclosure of personal information.

    What is a Super Output Area?

    The Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency has developed geographical units called ‘Super Output Areas’ (SOAs). These are aggregates of 2001 Census Output Areas and are a relatively small scale unit, containing an average of just more than 2000 people.

    Further information on how SOAs were created is available from the NISRA website. There are a total of 890 SOAs in Northern Ireland – you can see images of all NI SOAs via the Maps sections. Super Output Areas are the core reporting geography of the NI Multiple Deprivation Measure (2010).

    A set of slightly revised Super Output Areas (SOAs) were created for the 2011 census outputs. The 2011 Super Output areas are nearly identical to the 2001 Super Output Areas with the exception of three modifications (Derryaghy, Aldergrove and Loughview). Further information can be found in the NISRA website geography section, and you can view a detailed paper on the Modified Super Output Areas.

    Note: The SOA boundaries used in Area Profiles and Interactive Content relate to those boundaries prior to the Census 2011 SOA realignment. The exception to this is the Census 2011 area profiles and interactive content, which use the new SOA boundaries. The only areas impacted are Derryaghy, Aldergrove and Loughview.

    I live in X SOA is this the same as X ward?

    Not necessarily. 

    • Some wards are equivalent to SOAs with the same name (for example the Ardboe ward in Cookstown is also Ardboe SOA).
    •  
    • Some wards split into SOAs. These will have numbers in the title (for example the Fortwilliam ward in Belfast splits into 3 SOAs called Fortwilliam 1, Fortwilliam 2 and Fortwilliam 3).
    •  
    • Some wards combine to make an SOA (for example, the Ballylough ward and the Bushmills wards in Moyle were combined to form Ballylough & Bushmills SOA).

    What are Small Areas?

    A new statistical geography has been created for the dissemination of 2011 census outputs called Small Areas. Where possible Small Areas have been kept identical to the 2001 Census Output Areas to ensure comparability over time, however in a number of cases this was not possible and the new 2011 Small Areas were created by merging one or more of the 2001 Output Areas together.

    There are several reasons for merging:

    1. Fine grain geo-referencing inaccuracies of some properties in the 2001 Census have meant that comparability over time would be improved by merging one or two 2001 Census Output Areas together. You can view a detailed paper on Small Areas via the NISRA website.

    2. By 2011, the number of people/households in a 2001 Census Output Area did not meet the disclosure thresholds (i.e. areas that have decreased in either households, population or both).

    Minor changes to boundaries were required (specifically in Derryaghy, Aldergrove and Loughview).

    Further information on Small Areas can be found in the NISRA website geography section.

    Are Assembly Areas and Parliamentary Constituencies the same?

    Yes, but please take note of the following. Although the current Parliamentary Constituencies share exactly the same boundaries as the current Assembly Areas, there are previous versions of both and you may have heard them referred to by different names.

    The current Assembly Areas (AA) boundaries came into effect following the commencement of the official election period on 25th March 2011 when they were re-aligned with the current Parliamentary Constituency Boundaries that were in effect from the 2008 Westminster Parliamentary Elections. You may have heard these current Parliamentary Constituencies referred to as Westminster Parliamentary Constituencies (WPC). The previous Parliamentary Constituency Boundaries (PC 1992) were exactly the same as the previous Assembly Area boundaries (AA 1998). See summary below. The abbreviations in bold are the only ones used in the NINIS website.

    AA = AA (2011) = PC (2008) = WPC

    AA (1998) = PC (1992)

    Are Assembly Areas (AA) and Assembly Areas 1998 (AA 1998) the same?

    No, although 6 of the 18 areas have remained the same. At the start of the election period on 25th March 2011 the Assembly Areas in Northern Ireland changed. The NINIS website contains datasets based on these Assembly Areas and their predecessors (AA 1998). Within the website, data relating to the boundaries in place from 1998 to 2011 are labelled Assembly Area 1998 (AA 1998). Data relating to the current boundaries are labelled simply as Assembly Area (AA), although you may have heard the latter previously referred to as AA (2011).

    For more information please see Assembly Area Changes Guidance Document.

    Can I obtain copies of the digital boundary sets used on NINIS?

    You can access and download a range of digital products that support the use of geography in developing statistics. The range of digital products are for use within both Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and also the main statistical software systems. Information is available on 2001 Census Geography, Postal Geography, Urban/Rural Geography, Neighbourhood Renewal Areas, Peacelines and Travel to Work Areas.

    Further details on digital products are available at the NISRA Geography website

    Which geography are Neighbourhood Renewal Areas based on?

    To enable the provision of information at Neighbourhood Renewal Areas (NRAs) statistics are provided for groups of Output Areas that best approximate the NRA boundary. Groups of Output Areas do not fit exactly with NRA boundaries but are a good approximation. To enable the provision of Census 2011 information at Neighbourhood Renewal Areas, statistics are produced based on groups of Small Areas that best approximate the NRA boundary. Groups of Small Areas do not fit exactly with NRA boundaries but are a reasonable approximation – a list of the small areas grouped to approximate NRA boundaries is available.

    How are areas classed as urban or rural?

    Review of the Statistical Classification and Delineation of Settlements (2015)

    A subgroup of the Statistics Coordinating Group (SCG) was formed to take forward the review of the statistical classification and delineation of settlements. All Northern Ireland departments were invited to participate in the subgroup, which was chaired by a NISRA Board Member.

    This report, published in March 2015, represents an initial report from the subgroup to SCG. It makes a recommendation about a new classification of settlements, and includes a proposed line on an urban-rural classification.

    For more information please see Review of the Statistical Classification and Delineation of Settlements (PDF 1.7 MB)

    Look up tables for Urban/Rural (2015) will be added to NINIS when available

    Statistical Classification and Delineation of Settlements (2005)

    The Inter-Departmental Urban-Rural Definition Group produced a report in 2005 entitled ''Statistical Classification and Delineation of Settlements'', which classified each settlement in Northern Ireland into one of eight bands (A-H). They recommended that Government and other users should consider defining ''urban'' and ''rural'' areas in ways which are appropriate for different programmes and projects. In the absence of a programme-specific definition, Bands A-E can be defined as urban and Bands F-H as rural.

    For more information please see Statistical Classification and Delineation of Settlements

    Look up tables for Urban/Rural Classification (2005) are available under the People and Place Theme

    This definition is referred to on Area Profiles on the NINIS website

    Do you have a list of all wards/Super Output Areas in a particular Local Government District?

    Yes, the following files show wards and Super Output Areas (SOAs) in the 26 Local Government Districts in Northern Ireland:

    A set of slightly revised Super Output Areas (SOAs) were created for the 2011 census outputs. The 2011 Super Output areas are nearly identical to the 2001 Super Output Areas with the exception of three modifications (Derryaghy, Aldergrove and Loughview). Further information can be found in the NISRA website geography section and a detailed paper on the Modified Super Output Areas is also available.

    Do you have information on settlements?

    Review of the Statistical Classification and Delineation of Settlements

    A subgroup of the Statistics Coordinating Group (SCG) was formed to take forward the review of the statistical classification and delineation of settlements. All Northern Ireland departments were invited to participate in the subgroup, which was chaired by a NISRA Board Member.

    This report, published in March 2015, represents an initial report from the subgroup to SCG. It makes a recommendation about a new classification of settlements, and includes a proposed line on an urban-rural classification.

    Review of the Statistical Classification and Delineation of Settlements

    The Settlement Development Limits (SDL) used in the report can be found on the NISRA website.

    Census 2011 Key Statistics for Settlements in Northern Ireland

    Census 2011 statistics were produced for settlements (Settlement 2015) with 500 or more usual residents and can be viewed on the NISRA website.

    Is there guidance available for producing statistics for the new 11 Districts (LGD 2014)?

    You can view guidance on producing statistics for the 11 new Local Government Districts, as well as a look-up table, under the People and Places theme on the NINIS website.

    You can also view guidance on Outputs from the 2011 Census and the new local government boundaries on the NISRA website.

    What is Local Government District 2014 (LGD2014)?

    In 2008, the Northern Ireland Assembly approved the reform of Local Government. The change moved Local Government from the 26 current Districts (LGD1992) to 11 new Districts (LGD2014), as well as making changes to the powers of Local Government. The geographical changes were initiated through the Local Government (Boundaries) Act (Northern Ireland) 2008.

    The 11 new Districts became operational in April 2015. Further information on local government reform can be found on nidirect.

    Is there guidance available for producing statistics for the new District Electoral Areas (DEA2014)?

    You can view guidance on producing statistics for the 80 new District Electoral Areas (DEA2014), as well as a look-up table, under the People and Places theme on the NINIS website.

    What is District Electoral Area 2014 (DEA2014)?

    In 2008, the Northern Ireland Assembly approved the reform of Local Government. The change moved Local Government from 26 Districts (LGD1992) to 11 new Districts (LGD2014), as well as making changes to the powers of Local Government. The new Districts are made up of 80 District Electoral Areas (DEA2014), which form the basis for the electoral representation on councils.

  • Postcodes/Streets

    Why does the wrong area appear when I enter my postcode?

    Postcodes do not match up exactly to administrative boundaries, houses with the same postcode may lie on either side of a boundary. Postcodes are allocated to higher geographies using a 'centroid' grid-reference. This is based on all the properties within that postcode and uses the grid reference of the property nearest the average point. For example 12 houses with the same postcode - 10 lie in ward A and 2 lie in ward B, the house nearest the ''centroid'' lies in ward A so the postcode (and all the houses) will be allocated to ward A. This is why when you enter a postcode you may get a profile for a neighbouring area. 

    For further details on postcodes and geo-referencing please see Postal geography and geo-referencing paper

    Why does my postcode return no results on NINIS?

    There is a facility to look up your postcode on the NINIS website and see information on where you live which is based on the Central Postcode Directory (CPD). The Central Postcode Directory itself is derived from Land and Property Services (LPS) Pointer Address Database. Pointer is the address database for Northern Ireland and is maintained by Land & Property Services (LPS), with input from local councils and Royal Mail. Unfortunately NISRA do not have any control over the information on the Pointer database. You may wish to raise the issue with the Land and Property Services Team who can be contacted by email at mapping.helpdesk@finance-ni.gov.uk

    Can I obtain a copy of the lookup table which links postcodes to geographic areas?

    Yes - the Northern Ireland Central Postcode Directory (CPD) lists all postcodes and the geographic areas they are allocated to.

    The CPD is available for use by all Northern Ireland Mapping Agreement (NIMA) customers (this includes all Northern Ireland Civil Service Departments, Agencies, Non Departmental Public Bodies and Local Councils) by completing the terms and conditions document and returning it to ninis.nisra@finance-ni.gov.uk.

    Those working on behalf of NIMA customers should contact that organisation to obtain a sub-license.

    Non-NIMA customers can licence the product by contacting Land and Property Services by email at mapping.helpdesk@finance-ni.gov.uk

    The Northern Ireland Mapping Agreement (NIMA) is a corporate supply agreement for the use of Ordnance Survey Northern Ireland® (OSNI®) Digital Geographic Information to be used by Northern Ireland Civil Service (NICS) Departments, Agencies, Non Departmental Public Bodies (NDPBs) and Local Councils to support policy making, operational delivery and communication with the public. Further information about NIMA can be found in the document “LPS Mapping Public Task” found at: https://www.finance-ni.gov.uk/publications/lps-copyright-publications.

    Can I search by street name?

    Yes - you can search by postcode, street name or area in the Quick Profile search box on the NINIS Home page or using the search on the Area Profile page.

    Do you have a list of all streets in a particular ward?

    No - at present users can only search for postcodes/ individual streets or areas.

  • Using the information

    Do you have data on x?

    The quickest way to find out if data is available is to use the search function on the NINIS header, or the advanced search function. Alternatively browse through the statistics themes.

    Is there a list of all datasets and interactive content available on NINIS?

    You can view a complete list of all datasets and interactive content, by theme and subtheme, available on NINIS.

    How do I calculate a percentage?

    To calculate a percentage simply divide the smaller number by the bigger number and multiply by 100. The smaller number is the cases you are interested in (number of females, number of terraced houses etc.) and the larger number is the overall population (total population, total over 65s, all houses etc.).

    For example, if there are 50 houses in an area and 27 of these are detached, what percentage of houses are detached?

    27 / 50 then multiply by 100 = 54%

    How do I calculate percentage change over time?

    Percentage changes are always based on the original (oldest) value. Work out the difference between the two values, then divide by the oldest value. Then multiply the result by 100 to make it into a percentage.

    ( (new - old) / old ) * 100

    For example, if the average rates bill in an area was £500 in 2010 and £560 in 2011, what is the percentage change between 2010 and 2011?

    Calculate the difference between the two

    560 - 500 = an increase of 60

    60 / 500 = 0.12

    0.12 multiplied by 100 = an increase of 12%

    Can you send me email updates when new features are added to the site?

    Yes - you can subscribe to the NINIS e-zine, which provides updates on new data and features that have been added to the NINIS website.

    We promise to respect your privacy and will never pass your details on to any third party.

    To subscribe to the NINIS e-zine, please visit the About Us page.

    Can I use the maps in my report?

    Land and Property Services (LPS) provide all maps for the NINIS website. Single maps can be provided for private use or non commercial research that will not be reproduced. Acknowledgement of the Crown copyright information needs to be included on the map:

    This material is Crown Copyright and is reproduced with the permission of Land and Property Services under delegated authority from the Controller of Her Majesty`s Stationary Office, © Crown copyright and database rights” NIMA MOU207.2 (insert year of publication)”.

    Where space does not permit on maps less than 200 sq centimetres:  “© Crown copyright and database rights(insert year of publication)” will suffice.

    Permission to reproduce or publish ©Crown Copyright maps produced by LPS needs to be obtained from LPS. Contact LPS Intellectual Property Rights Branch on 028 9033 6702 or e-mail copyright@finance-ni.gov.uk Alternatively go to their internet pages at: https://www.finance-ni.gov.uk/articles/lps-copyright-licensing-and-publishing .

    The Northern Ireland Mapping Agreement (NIMA) is a corporate supply agreement for the use of Ordnance Survey Northern Ireland® (OSNI®) Digital Geographic Information to be used by Northern Ireland Civil Service (NICS) Departments, Agencies, Non Departmental Public Bodies (NDPBs) and Local Councils to support policy making, operational delivery and communication with the public. Further information about NIMA can be found in the document “LPS Mapping Public Task” found at: https://www.finance-ni.gov.uk/publications/lps-copyright-publications

    Can I use the information in my report?

    Yes. The material featured on this site is subject to Crown copyright protection unless otherwise indicated. The Crown copyright protected material (other than departmental or agency logos) may be reproduced free of charge in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence.

    For more information please visit Open Government Licence for public sector information

    This is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and not used in a misleading context. Where any of the Crown copyright items on this site are being republished or copied to others, the source of the material must be identified and the copyright status acknowledged.
    Source: Neighbourhood Statistics (NISRA) Website: www.nisra.gov.uk/ninis

    Any enquiries regarding the use and re-use of this information resource should be sent to psi@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk.

    We encourage users to establish hypertext links to this website. The permission to reproduce Crown protected material does not extend to any material on this site which is identified as being the copyright of a third party. Authorisation to reproduce such material must be obtained from the copyright holders.

    What is the @NISRANINIS Twitter account?

    The NISRANINIS twitter account was opened in February 2011. Follow us @NISRANINIS.

    Tweets contain information on datasets that have been published on the Northern Ireland Neighbourhood Information Service (NINIS) or on the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) website, and announcements of training dates and events.

    The twitter account is monitored at regular intervals throughout the working week. We can take no responsibility for any point at which this service is not available, whether this is due to our actions or to more general issues with Twitter or internet access in your area.

    We welcome all feedback. We cannot guarantee that we will reply individually to all messages we receive through Twitter but we can guarantee that we will read all @replies and Direct Messages and forward responses and feedback to the relevant areas within NISRA.

    We encourage users to follow us. If you do this, we will not follow you back automatically, and being followed by us is not an endorsement of any kind. We will periodically update this statement to reflect changes. When we do this, we will tweet the update.

    Does NINIS have a Disclosure Control Policy?

    A document detailing the NINIS Statistical Disclosure Control Policy is available to download. The document gives background and outlines the main statistical disclosure control methods used on NINIS.

     For more information please see NINIS Statistical Disclosure Policy

  • Interactive Content

    Why does the Interactive Content not work for me?

    Before viewing the interactive content you will need to download and install Adobe SVG viewer or an Adobe Flash Player from the Internet. Both software plug-ins can be downloaded from links on the Interactive Content page or from the links below.

    Adobe SVG Viewer Adobe Flash Player

    Some users may need to click on each section of the interactive content before it will function; the words "click to activate and use this control" may appear when you hover over the interactive content. This is an issue with windows, the interactive content will function normally once you have clicked to activate.

    You should also ensure that your browser supports HTML5.

    Can I map the data on the website?

    Yes, there are atlases of pre-created thematic maps or 'Interactive Maps' with lots of interactive functionality. There are two types of interactive maps relating to the software used to create and output these maps.

  • Training

    Do you provide training on how to use the NINIS website?

    We provide both monthly seminars which incorporate PC-based training on how to use the NINIS website in McAuley House (Belfast city centre) and ad-hoc commissioned seminars region-wide.

    For further details and the registration form for the monthly seminars please visit the NINIS Workshops page.

  • Deprivation

    What is the Northern Ireland Multiple Deprivation Measure?

    The Northern Ireland Multiple Deprivation Measure 2010 (NI MDM 2010) is a measure of multiple deprivation at the small area level. The model of multiple deprivation which underpins the NIMDM 2010 is based on the idea of distinct domains of deprivation which can be recognised and measured separately. These are experienced by individuals living in an area. People may be counted as deprived in one or more of the domains, depending on the number of types of deprivation that they experience. The overall MDM is conceptualised as a weighted area level aggregation of these specific domains of deprivation. Further information on Deprivation is available on the NISRA website.

    What is a domain?

    There are seven ‘domains' which make up the Multiple Deprivation Measure and describe the ‘type’ of deprivation they cover. The domains are as follows:

    • Income deprivation
    • Employment deprivation
    • Health Deprivation & Disability deprivation
    • Education & Training deprivation
    • Proximity to Services deprivation
    • Living Environment deprivation
    • Crime & Disorder deprivation

    The overall multiple deprivation measure is a weighted average of the seven domains of deprivation, with weights of 25%, 25%, 15%, 15%, 10%, 5% and 5% respectively. The weights assigned to domains in the NIMDM 2010 were the same as those assigned to domains in the NIMDM 2005 and the 2001 index of multiple deprivation. For more information on choosing domain weights please see:

    Domain Weights Analysis

    How can I access Deprivation statistics on NINIS?

    Select ‘Deprivation’ from the Statistical drop down menu to view Deprivation datasets,or select ‘Deprivation’ from the Interactive Content section to view Deprivation interactive maps.

    Is there deprivation information available for the 11 new district councils?

    Yes, NIMDM 2010 Area Profiles have now been produced for the 11 new councils. Click here for further information.

    Can I use NIMDM 2010 results now that statistical geography boundaries have changed?

    The Northern Ireland Multiple Deprivation Measure (NIMDM 2010) is the official measure of spatial deprivation in Northern Ireland – the main measure is at the Super Output Area (SOA) level. Further information relating to SOA Changes and Output Area/Small Area changes is available from the NINIS website.

  • Making Life Better

    What is ‘Making Life Better’?

    Making Life Better’ is the strategic framework for public health. It is designed to provide direction for policies and actions to improve the health and wellbeing of people in Northern Ireland and to reduce inequalities in health. It builds on the former public health strategy Investing for Health.

    What ‘Making Life Better’ information is available on NINIS and how can I access it?

    The NINIS website provides information on key health and well-being indicators relating to the ‘Making Life Better’ Strategy’s themes and key overarching objectives. You can access datasets within the ‘Making Life Better’ section by selecting ‘Making Life Better’ from the ‘Statistics’ drop down menu.  You can then select the relevant Making Life Better Theme or Key Indicators. Results can then be filtered by year or geography. 

    How do I obtain an Area Profile without a postcode?

    You can type the following into the search box:

    'all HSCTs' to access results for all Health and Social Care Trusts

    'all LGD2014s' to access results for all Local Government Districts (11 Councils)

    You should then click on area of interest (HSCT/LGD2014) and then select the Making Life Better tab.

    Is there any guidance on how to access Making Life Better Datasets, Area Profiles and Interactive Content?

    Yes, a NINIS for Making Life Better User Guide along with other useful guides and video tutorials are available in the Learning Zone

  • Neighbourhood Renewal

    What is Neighbourhood Renewal?

    In June 2003, Government launched “People and Place – A strategy for Neighbourhood Renewal”. This long term (7 – 10 year) strategy targets those communities throughout Northern Ireland suffering the highest levels of deprivation. Neighbourhood Renewal is a cross government strategy and aims to bring together the work of all Government Departments in partnership with local people to tackle disadvantage and deprivation in all aspects of everyday life.

    Neighbourhoods in the most deprived 10% of wards across Northern Ireland were identified using the Noble Multiple Deprivation Measure. Following extensive consultation, this resulted in a total of 36 areas, and a population of approximately 280,000 (one person in 6 in Northern Ireland), being targeted for intervention. The areas include: 15 in Belfast, 6 in the North West, and 15 in other towns and cities across Northern Ireland. The NRAs are organised within the Department for Social Development's North West Development Office, Regional Development Office and Belfast Regeneration Office. Neighbourhood Partnerships have been established in each Neighbourhood Renewal Area (NRA) as a vehicle for local planning and implementation.

    Further information on the Department of Social Development’s Neighbourhood Renewal Strategy can be found here.

    What Neighbourhood Renewal information is available on NINIS and how can I access it?

    NINIS provides statistical information and maps for the 36 Neighbourhood Renewal Areas (NRA); you can view a location map of all NRAs. Information is available across a range of themes including population, health and social care, education and skills, crime and economics. Also available is a list of all datasets and interactive content available at NRA level.

    How can I find out if an area is included within a Neighbourhood Renewal Area?

    If you want to find out if an area or postcode is included within a Neighbourhood Renewal Area, you can contact the Neighbourhood Renewal Unit.

    To enable the provision of information at Neighbourhood Renewal Areas (NRAs) statistics are provided for groups of Output Areas that best approximate the NRA boundary. Groups of Output Areas do not fit exactly with NRA boundaries but are a good approximation. To enable the provision of Census 2011 information at Neighbourhood Renewal Areas, statistics are produced based on groups of Small Areas that best approximate the NRA boundary. Groups of Small Areas do not fit exactly with NRA boundaries but are a reasonable approximation – a list of the small areas grouped to approximate NRA boundaries is available.

    You can view a static map of each Neighbourhood Renewal Area by clicking on the Map tab in the top menu bar, typing in ‘all NRAs’ to the search box, and clicking on the relevant NRA.

    Can I download digital boundary files for Neighbourhood Renewal Areas?

    Digital boundaries for the Neighbourhood Renewal Areas can be downloaded from the NISRA Geography website.

    Can I view a list of all Neighbourhood Renewal Areas?

    Yes, if you type ‘all NRAs’ into the NINIS search box, it will return a list of all Neighbourhood Renewal Areas.

    Which Development Office does a Neighbourhood Renewal Area belong to?

    The NRAs are organised within the Department for Social Development's North West Development Office (NWDO), Regional Development Office (RDO) and Belfast Regeneration Office (BRO). You can also view a list of NRAs within each DO.

    Why is some statistical data only available at Development Office level, or for grouped years, for example, Crude Suicide Rates, Deaths from suicide?

    Some statistical data are so small that, to avoid disclosure, data may be released only at the higher geography or for grouped years.

    Can I compare a Neighbourhood Renewal Area to Non Neighbourhood Renewal Areas within NINIS?

    Yes, if you open a Neighbourhood Renewal dataset, click on the ‘Available geographies’ drop down and select ‘DO’ (Development Office) - the fourth row in this table shows the Non Neighbourhood Renewal figures within that dataset.

  • Other Issues

    I think there is an error in the data what should I do?

    Please email us highlighting the specific dataset and the suspected error. You can also phone us on 028 9034 8111. We will then respond as appropriate.

    To see a list of datasets which have recently been revised please see: NINIS Revisions and Issues Log.

    The 2011 Census Revisions & Issues log is also available.

    How do I obtain an area profile if I only have an area code and no name?

    Download the following spreadsheet which contains all codes and names used on the website: Names and Codes

    Once you have identified the area name from this spreadsheet, you can obtain the area profile by choosing the areas from a map or list. Follow the steps described in the question above.

    How do I obtain an area profile if I am unsure of the area name?

    You can type the following into the search box:

    'all HSCTs' to access results for all Health and Social Care Trusts

    'all LGDs' to access results for all Local Government Districts

    'all NRAs' to access results for all Neighbourhood Renewal Areas

    'all SOAs' to access results for all Super Output Areas

    'all SAs' to access results for all Small Areas

    'all OAs' to access results for all Output Areas

    'all settlements' to access results for all settlements

    'all wards' to access results for all wards

    'all AAs' to access results for all Assembly Areas

    'all HSSBs' to access results for all Health and Social Services Boards

    Why are some datasets available in the data grid view in NINIS and others only available in Excel?

    Some datasets are only available in Excel as they are too large to load into the data grid, or the data itself doesn't lend itself to grid format. For example, locational data under the People and Places theme is not loaded in at a geographical level and would therefore not be able to be displayed in the grid.

    I have saved a link to a table on NINIS - why does my saved link no longer let me access the dataset?

    When latest year data is received into NINIS for a particular dataset, the table itself is deleted and a new table with the latest year data included uploaded. This means the link will have changed. Ideally, you should save a link to the statistics theme page rather than specific datasets, as the theme link will never change, but the table links will.